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Intestacy

If you die without making a Will your estate will not necessarily pass on to whom you want.

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Will Writing

Wills are not just for passing on your estate. They can be used for Inheritance Tax planning, appointing Guardians for children, passing on businesses, protecting assets from care costs etc.

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Long Term Care

Steps can be taken to protect assets from being sold to pay for long term care fees.

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Lasting Power of Attorney

If you have mental incapacity no one (including spouses and close family) has automatic rights to take over your affairs.

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Business Succession

If you are a owner of a business will it continue after your death?

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Inheritance Tax

How do you reduce the impact of inheritance tax?

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Document Storage

Do you and your family know where your Wills are kept?

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Probate &
Estate Administration

Do you need help in administering an estate?

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Intestacy

If you die without having made a Will you are Intestate. If you have assets in England or Wales, these assets will pass according to the Administration of Estates Act 1925 (the “Act”). Different laws apply in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The following paragrpahs explain how your estate would be administered according to the Act if you are married (this includes being legally separated or divorced with a decree nisi but not absolute) or in a civil partnership at the time of your death.

If you are married or in a civil partnership and do not have any chidren, your partner will inherit your entire esatte.

If you do have children then your partner will inherit the first £250,000 of your estate and 50% of the balance will pass to your partner and 50% to your children (from age 18).

* Assets owned as beneficial joint owners pass by survivorship and are in addition to the £250,000

** “Children” includes illegitimate and adopted children but does not include step children or children adopted out.

*** "Chattels” includes cars, jewellery, furniture, household goods etc.. It does not include cash, property or investments etc..

The following flowchart explains how your estate would be administered according to the Act if you are not married or in a civil partnership at the time of your death.

intestacy diagram two

Note:

* “Children” includes illegitimate and adopted children but does not include step children or children adopted out.

If you don’t want your estate to pass according to the previous flowcharts you must make a Will.